Meet Obataimu

Obataimu is a fashion label and design studio based in Mumbai and founded by Noorie Sadarangani. The name comes from the Japanese word for 'over time,' in which Sadarangani seeks to question why people are overworked and don't have time for themselves.

FOUNDER: Noorie Sadarangani

TEAM: self-encouraged everyday people looking forward to expanding their skills.

LOCATION: Mumbai, India.

MATERIALS: Silk, cotton. Self-crafted fabrics.
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    About the founder

    NOORIE SADARANGANI

    Inspired by her travels to Japan, Sadarangani created Obataimu by drawing inspiration from the Japanese Wabi-Sabi philosophy, a movement that empowers "slow art", and Shibui, a focus on the charm and challenge of simplicity in design. More than a brand, more like a school, this atelier sells hand-stitched stationery and custom-made garments. Fabrics are hand-dyed into unisex, fluid, and comfortable silhouettes.

    Story & Highlights

    Inspired by her travels to Japan, Sadarangani created Obataimu by drawing inspiration from the Japanese Wabi-Sabi philosophy, a movement that empowers "slow art", and Shibui, a focus on the charm and challenge of simplicity in design. More than a brand, more like a school, this atelier sells hand-stitched stationery and custom-made garments. Fabrics are hand-dyed into unisex, fluid, and comfortable silhouettes.

    At school in Japan, they stand firmly on the foundation of the Takumi principle of mastery, where the essence lies in the profound mastery of one's craft and the sacred tradition of "passing on" knowledge. This principle elevates the status of artisans within their respective trades, emphasizing the importance of not just producing, but perfecting their art.

    In the brand's studio, they embody the "farm to table" concept. Obataimu draws inspiration from the food industry's progress, where customer demands drive better production standards and healthier supply chains. In fashion, there's a lack of communication between retailers, brands, designers, producers, and farmers. Today, skilled artisans in India are dwindling, replaced by mass production roles that dehumanize tasks.